Spotify’s Daniel Ek: The Most Important Man In Music – Forbes

July 21st, 2011--Aspen, CO, USA Daniel Ek, CEO...

Spotify’s Daniel Ek created a free, Facebook-enabled platform that could save the recording industry from piracy–and iTunes.

It’s a typically damp, dark November afternoon in Stockholm, and Daniel Ek is ill. Over the past month the 28-year-old chief executive of Spotify has worn himself down jetting from his Swedish base to San Francisco, New York, Denmark, the Netherlands and France to visit his expanding sales force and launch his music service in one or another of the dozen countries it now operates in.

But there’s no rest for the weary. Next week he’s scheduled to return to New York to unveil Spotify’s new platform in front of his first-ever press conference—a platform that he admits still isn’t ready for a public debut. “I should be home in bed,” sighs Ek, his voice weak and scratchy, “but we need to get this thing perfect.” So the bald, barrel-chested Ek zips his white hoodie to his chin, swaps tea for his morning cup of coffee—the first of six he throws down in a typical day—and heads into an office that resembles a university library during finals. The pool table has been traded for more IKEA desks, and gray daybeds offer a place to nap between all-nighters. Forgoing his large office, which he mostly uses as a meeting room, Ek plops himself down at an open desk. Around him, a dozen engineers from nearly as many countries, united by their geek-chic uniforms—skinny jeans, printed T-shirts and cardigans—frantically bang out code on their silver MacBooks.

via Spotify’s Daniel Ek: The Most Important Man In Music – Forbes.

Strange Random Digital Music Quote:

From a technical point of view, there seemed to me to be absolutely no reason why – with the existing technology – we couldn’t do very high quality audio, because whereas the boom in digital graphics is ongoing, the boom in digital audio has already happened. – Thomas Dolby

 

 

 

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Posted on January 8, 2012, in Article and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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