Mostly Made in America – Businessweek

Here’s one way to gauge the growing interest in buying and selling products made in America: When David Seliktar wanted to set up a website offering goods produced only in the U.S., all the obvious names were taken — including StillMadeInTheUSA.com. Seliktar’s KeepAmerica.com will open for business at the end of March, with some 200 vendors selling everything from furniture to clothes, toys, jewelry, and food. Prices will range from a couple of dollars to a couple of thousand.

“If everyone spent even 10 percent more than they do now on American-made products, our economy would improve,” says Seliktar, who has helped run a family jewelry business in New York.

Separating hype and hope from reality can be challenging. Last year Wal-Mart Stores WMT proudly announced that more than half its products were made in America. Not quite. Turns out that half its sales were from products made in America. And that’s because half its sales came from groceries and household goods, two categories easily sourced in the U.S. It also helped that sales of electronics and clothes—two categories not easily sourced in the U.S. at Wal-Mart prices—had shrunk.

Then, last month, the Detroit Free Press looked into Kid Rock’s Made in Detroit T-shirts and found some had not been made in Detroit, after all. Designed and sold in Detroit, yes, but manufactured in India, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, even Ohio.

via Mostly Made in America – Businessweek.

Strange Random Manufacturing Quote:

“I have come to a resolution myself as I hope every good citizen will, never again to purchase any article of foreign manufacture which can be had of American make be the difference of price what it may”

Thomas Jefferson (American 3rd US President (1801-09). Author of the Declaration of Independence. 1762-1826)

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Posted on March 24, 2012, in Article and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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