Blog Archives

Tablet Computers Added to Basket Of Goods & Services Used To Measure Inflation | Business | Sky News

Tablet computers and teenage fiction have been added to the list of items that the Office for National Statistics (ONS) uses to calculate inflation.

The so-called ‘shopping basket’ is reviewed each year and items are added or removed according to their on-going relevance in modern consumer society.

Also added for 2012 are cans of Stout to differentiate between other beers, pineapple and baby wipes.

“We already collect apples, pears, oranges, grapes, bananas etc, but exotic fruit is becoming more popular so we brought in pineapple to represent the consumers who purchase that,” explains Darren Morgan from the ONS.

The basket traditionally keeps track of changing technological habits; Smartphones and Apps were added in 2011 and bundled communication packages (internet, phone and tv subscriptions) have been included this year.

Conversely, the cost of developing and printing colour camera films has been removed due to the now virtual dominance of digital cameras.

But it can also characterise what might be best described as guilty pleasures: takeaway chicken and chips is a new addition to the 2012 list.

via Tablet Computers Added to Basket Of Goods & Services Used To Measure Inflation | Business | Sky News.

Strange Random Inflation Quote:

“By a continuing process of inflation, government can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens.” – John Maynard Keynes(English economist, journalist, and financier, 1883-1946)

 

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Raspberry Pi Foundation Launch Tiny Cheap Computer Aimed At Getting Children Programming | Technology | Sky News

A mini computer that aims to get a new generation of children programming and writing software has been launched in the UK – with initial interest crashing the manufacturer’s website.

Called the Raspberry Pi and costing just £22, the machine has been created by a research team of volunteers in the UK.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation is a UK charity that claims it wants to encourage school children to learn programming skills and write software.

Sir Clive Sinclair‘s ZX Spectrum, the Commodore 64 and the BBC Micro machines made computing accessible to children in the 80s and sparked a wave of young bedroom software developers.

The Raspberry team have said the aim was to make “a BBC Micro for the 21st century”.

Sold without a keyboard or mouse and uncased, the motherboard is the size of a credit card, with developers saying the final package will be the size of a pack of playing cards.

“It has been six years in the making; the number of things that had to go right for this to happen is enormous. I couldn’t be more pleased,” said Eben Upton of the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

via Raspberry Pi Foundation Launch Tiny Cheap Computer Aimed At Getting Children Programming | Technology | Sky News.

Strange Random Computer Quote:

Computers are like Old Testament gods; lots of rules and no mercy. – Joseph Campbell

 

 

 

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New £50 Note: Bank Of England Reveals Bill To Launch On November 2 | Business | Sky News

A new £50 note is being issued on November 2 this year, with a range of new security features designed to outwit crooks.

The Bank of England is staying tight-lipped for now on what the special anti-counterfeiting measures are – although it promises to reveal all when the new notes enter circulation.

At first, the new note will be accepted alongside the current £50 banknote, which came out in 1994 and features Sir John Houblon, the first Governor of the Bank of England.

In due course that note will be withdrawn and only the new one accepted.

Featuring on the back of the new note are the 18th century business partners Matthew Boulton and James Watt, who were pioneers of the industrial revolution.

via New £50 Note: Bank Of England Reveals Bill To Launch On November 2 | Business | Sky News.

Strange Random Banknote Quote:

The [Canadian] $10 note features the first verse of John McCrae‘s poem, “In Flanders Fields”, and its French adaptation, Au champ d’honneur, by Jean Pariseau

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below. “

(courtesy of CoinPeople)

 

 

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Tony Hayward Gets His Life Back – BusinessWeek

BP CEO Tony Hayward: "I'd like my life ba...

Image by elycefeliz via Flickr

As chief executive officer of BP, Tony Hayward presided over the worst oil spill in U.S. history, which led the company to take $41 billion in charges. Now he’s preparing to immerse himself in the energy industry again. Hayward stepped down as BP’s CEO on Oct.1 , 2010, after being roundly attacked for comments he made the previous spring, as the Macondo well in the Gulf of Mexico was still spewing oil. “No one wants this thing over more than I do,” he said. “You know, I would like my life back.” The N.Y. Daily News called Hayward “the most hated—and the most clueless—man in America.”

via Tony Hayward Gets His Life Back – BusinessWeek.

Strange Random BP Oil Quote:

“I think the environmental impact of this disaster is likely to have been very, very modest.” —Tony Hayward, interview with Sky News television, May 2010

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Viadeo Peter Crosby On Why LinkedIn IPO Is Good For All Social Networks | Business | Sky News

Image representing LinkedIn as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

When LinkedIn raised its projected IPO target this week by as much as 30% it also raised a few eyebrows. The social network expects to raise approximately $400m £240m and is being watched closely by other social media firms including us to see how the markets react. The initial valuation seems high to those without the inside track. This inevitably prompts questions: Is this a bubble? Will it burst? Will it damage future social media deals?

via Viadeo Peter Crosby On Why LinkedIn IPO Is Good For All Social Networks | Business | Sky News.

Strange Random Stock Market Quote:

“The problem is that the stock market tends to predict downturns or upturns too early. The common joke is that the stock market predicted 11 out of the last 9 recessions.” – Sung Won Sohn

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