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6 reasons that you should speak up at work – Money – TODAY.com

At a time where the demand for transparent communication in the workplace is at a premium, employees are not speaking-up enough. How you express your opinions at work or not is a direct reflection upon how people experience who you are and what you represent as a team member, department leader and as an individual. Your voice defines the value you bring to the organization. In most cases, your identity is misrepresented because your voice does not consistently communicate what is really on your mind. If this sounds too familiar, it is apparent that you are not performing at your most optimum levels.

The ongoing political dynamics in the workplace makes it easy for employees to voice their opinion. For example, the next time you are in a meeting, ask yourself, “Who is really adding value to the goals of the conversation?” In a meeting of five people you are lucky if more than two consistently deliver. In fact, how many times has someone said to you in a meeting, “That’s a great idea you should do something with it.” What happens? More often than not, the idea remains dormant and then it dies.

Did someone hold you accountable to act upon the idea? Were the other people in the meeting paying attention to the opportunity that was presented to you?In today’s workplace, more people are keeping quiet and are just going with the flow — thinking that this is the best way to advance, get noticed and / or win the political gaming that takes place at work. For others, it is a survival mechanism.

via 6 reasons that you should speak up at work – Money – TODAY.com.

Strange Random Speaking Quote:

‘Of those who say nothing, few are silent.’ – Thomas Neiel

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Ten Things Only Bad Managers Say – BusinessWeek

My Boss My Hero

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We know the kinds of things good managers say: They say “Attaboy” or “Attagirl,” “Let me know if you run into any roadblocks, and I’ll try to get rid of them for you,” and “You’ve been killing yourself—why don’t you take off at noon on Friday?”

Bad managers don’t say these things. Helpful, encouraging, and trust-based words and phrases don’t occur to them.

Crappy bosses say completely different things. For your enjoyment, we’ve gathered together 10 of the most heinous, bad-manager warhorse sayings. Do any of them sound like something a manager in your company might say or might have said this week?

If you don’t want this job, I’ll find someone who does.

Great leaders understand that the transaction defining the employer-employee relationship—the fact that an employer pays you in cash while you cough up your value in sweat and brainwork—is the least important part of your professional relationship. Good managers realize that to get and keep great people, they have to move past the dollars-and-cents transaction and let people own their jobs. Good leaders give people latitude and let them know that their contributions have value. Lousy managers, on the other hand, love to remind employees that it’s all about the transaction: “You work for me.” They never fail to remind team members that someone else would take the job if you ever got sick of it or let the lousy manager down in some way.

I don’t pay you to think.

This is what a bad manager says when an employee offers an idea he doesn’t like. Maybe the idea threatens the inept manager’s power. Maybe it would require the lousy manager to expend a few brain cells or some political capital within the organization. Either way, “I don’t pay you to think” is the mantra of people who have no business managing teams. It screams, “Do what I tell you to do, and nothing else.” Life is way too short to spend another minute working for someone who could speak these words.

via Ten Things Only Bad Managers Say – BusinessWeek.

Strange Random Management Quote:

“Good management is the art of making problems so interesting and their solutions so constructive that everyone wants to get to work and deal with them.” – Paul Hawken

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Most people happy with working hours | News.com.au

Australian Bureau of Statistics

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JACK IN the proverball work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” was unlikely to have been Australian. Most Australians are happy with the number of hours they work each week and believe they are achieving the right work/life balance. But a new report also found that nearly a quarter of workers would prefer fewer hours on the job to be able to participate in recreational and social activities or just have free time. The Australian Bureau of Statistics latest social trends survey, released today, found that in 2007 65 per cent of the workers aged 15 years or older felt they were working close to their preferred number of hours. However, 14 per cent of those surveyed between April and July 2007 wanted to work more hours, while 21 per cent would prefer to be working fewer hours, deemed as overemployed.

via Most people happy with working hours | News.com.au.

Strange Random Work Quote:

No bees, no honey; no work, no money. – Proverb

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